Calamari in Mykonos Town, Greece, Mediterranean diet
/ Inside Food science
/ Inside Food science

Exactly why is a Mediterranean diet good for you?

The Mediterranean diet is the cornerstone of cultures considered to be the healthiest in the world, but do you know exactly what defines it?

In many previous editions of the Food Matters Live podcast, it’s kept cropping up…

When we talked about Covid and nutrition, there it was.  When we talked about the gut microbiome, there it was.  And when we talked about nutrition and age, you guessed it, there it was again.

It’s hugely influential, but our guest in this episode, says many people are confused about what a Mediterranean diet actually is.

That confusion means many people are failing to get the benefits of the diet.

So if people are confused, how can they be sure that they are eating the right foods? Apparently, it’s all in the colour and the taste of what we consume.

And what are the benefits? Why is the Mediterranean diet so good for us? What chemistry is happening inside our bodies when we eat certain foods?

Critics of adopting the diet away from the Mediterranean think it’s difficut to replicate outside the region, saying many factors such as lifestyle, climate, and community play too big a role.

But our guest, although acknowleding those wider factors, says there is evidence it can be beneficial to anyone, anywhere in the world.

Listen to the full episode to learn more about the science supporting the adoption of the Mediterranean diet, its role in reducing inflammation, and why extra virgin olive oil is such an crucial element.

Simon Poole, doctor, author and consultant

Simon Poole MBBS DRCOG FBMA MIANE is a Cambridge-based medical doctor, author, communicator and consultant, and is an internationally renowned authority on the science and application of the Mediterranean Diet and lifestyle.

His award winning books, “The Olive Oil Diet” and “The Real Mediterranean Diet” offer a way to access the healthiest nutrition in the world. 

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Dr Simon Poole

Contributor

Doctor, author and consultant

Each time you sit down for a meal, you influence the low levels of inflammation that are going on throughout the day. It's exciting because what we eat can have an impact.

Dr Simon Poole