Can regenerative agriculture fix our food system?

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24 min listen

Healthy soil is full of living organisms that help to generate the nutrients crops need to grow. But many conventional farming practices inadvertently degrade soil health over time, which in turn can reduce crop yields. Regenerative Agriculture aims to capture carbon in soil and aboveground biomass, reversing current global trends of atmospheric accumulation. At the same time, it offers increased yields, resilience to climate instability, and higher health and vitality for farming and ranching communities.

To explore regenerative agriculture and to find out the impact it could have on our environment, we once again, in partnership with Anglo American, join experts in the field to share their insight and experience. We speak to Ross Mitchell, Head of Agronomy and Technical Services, Anglo American Crop Nutrients and Paul Davey, seventh generation farmer and conservation agriculture contractor. Find out how we can regenerate our agriculture to improve sustainability in the future.

About our panel

Ross Mitchell, Head of Agronomy and Technical Services, Anglo American Crop Nutrients

Ross runs a global agronomy team overseeing the development of POLY4 in support of the company’s commercial contracts. With over 30-years experience, Ross has a wide spectrum of knowledge of agricultural practices ranging from the research of nutrient and pesticide dynamics in soil to seed production.

Before joining Anglo American, Ross specialised for eight years in sugar production – initially for large and smallholder farmers in China followed by large new farms in North Africa and the Indian subcontinent.

Paul Davey, Farmer

Paul Davey is a seventh generation farmer and conservation agriculture contractor. His wife manages their wholesale distribution and retail business which specialises in food, drinks and homeware made in Lincolnshire, UK. They run a shop in Lincoln which has an online home delivery service.

The farm specialises in seed production growing cereals, oilseeds, grass seeds and pulses, including vining peas for Birds Eye. A lambing flock of Lleyn ewes is run in conjunction with the arable enterprises and the farm pursues a strategy of healthy soils producing heathy plants and healthy food.

Paul was a finalist in the Soil Farmer of the Year competition 2019.

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